archiemcphee:

Before he created his awesome LEGO anatomy sculpture, artist Jason Freeny made this fantastic Micro Schematic chart of the different anatomical systems inside your average little LEGO figure. 
[via Plastic and Plush]
Thanks to David Dupuy for sharing the link with us!

archiemcphee:

Before he created his awesome LEGO anatomy sculpture, artist Jason Freeny made this fantastic Micro Schematic chart of the different anatomical systems inside your average little LEGO figure. 

[via Plastic and Plush]

Thanks to David Dupuy for sharing the link with us!

musts:

© Luke Chan
Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore,
Santo Spirito, Florence, Tuscany, Italy

musts:

© Luke Chan

Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore,

Santo Spirito, Florence, Tuscany, Italy

lightprocesses:

Exponential sine waves

lightprocesses:

Exponential sine waves

1ucasvb:

Affine transformations preserve parallel lines, and include rotations, scaling, shears and translations. Linear transformations can’t perform translations, but this can be achieved if we go to a higher dimension.
In this animation, a planar (2D) shape lying on the plane z = 1 is translated by means of a linear transformation in three dimensions: a shear along the z axis.
Rotations can be performed normally, also around the z axis. For rotations around any other axis parallel to the z axis, it’s just a matter of performing the appropriate translation that cancels out the translation of the axis performed by the rotation.
This way, all transformations are now linear in 3D, and can be represented by a single 3x3 affine transformation matrix that acts on two dimensions.
The “shadow” of the shape illustrates the relative position between the two images, on the planes z = 0 and z = 1, and was included to better visualize the shear and how it is linear in 3D space.

1ucasvb:

Affine transformations preserve parallel lines, and include rotations, scaling, shears and translations. Linear transformations can’t perform translations, but this can be achieved if we go to a higher dimension.

In this animation, a planar (2D) shape lying on the plane z = 1 is translated by means of a linear transformation in three dimensions: a shear along the z axis.

Rotations can be performed normally, also around the z axis. For rotations around any other axis parallel to the z axis, it’s just a matter of performing the appropriate translation that cancels out the translation of the axis performed by the rotation.

This way, all transformations are now linear in 3D, and can be represented by a single 3x3 affine transformation matrix that acts on two dimensions.

The “shadow” of the shape illustrates the relative position between the two images, on the planes z = 0 and z = 1, and was included to better visualize the shear and how it is linear in 3D space.

mathmajik:

Snowy Mathematical Art from Simon Beck

Simon is an artist and is most well-known for making incredibly delicate and detailed art in the snow, just by walking over a fresh snowfall. He literally walks miles in the snow to create these pieces. He could spend hours upon hours creating one design, just to have it be covered by snowfall or blown away by the next day. But he still makes them.

These delicate patterns were created in the beautiful Savoie Valley in France, overlooking Mont Blanc.

He creates large, mathematical patterns that have different effects when viewed from different angles.

Source: viralnova.com Images: Simon Beck

skidmoreowingsmerrill:

Turning Bridge-Building Sideways

In 1978, SOM architect Myron Goldsmith and engineer T.Y. Lin created a remarkable structure to span the challenging middle fork of California’s American River. Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge elegantly solves the problem of building a stable, economical structure across a wide, steep gorge by entirely rethinking the principles of bridge-building. A “hanging arc,” the bridge was to be suspended by 80 high-strength cables and balanced by tensile forces. Though unbuilt, Ruck-A-Chucky Bridge stands as a masterwork of innovative design and structural economy to this day. Learn more

webofgoodnews:

Students Build Record-Breaking Solar Electric Car
eVe is powered by a Li-ion battery pack, an enormous bank of off-the-shelf laptop computer batteries, that drives a pair of custom designed motors with a staggering 97% efficiency. The motors were designed by the Australian national science agency, CSIRO. A solar array consisting of high efficiency flexible thin-film silicon PV cells provides up to 800 Watts of power on a sunny day. Regenerative braking replenishes the batteries, recovering up to 80% of the braking energy.
The car is capable of traveling 140 km/h (87 mph). Driving at highway speeds, eVe uses the equivalent power of a four-slice kitchen toaster. Its range is 800 km (500 mi) using the battery pack supplemented by the solar panels, and 500 km (310 mi) on battery power only.
Read more and see video
Webofgoodnews.com

webofgoodnews:

Students Build Record-Breaking Solar Electric Car

eVe is powered by a Li-ion battery pack, an enormous bank of off-the-shelf laptop computer batteries, that drives a pair of custom designed motors with a staggering 97% efficiency. The motors were designed by the Australian national science agency, CSIRO. A solar array consisting of high efficiency flexible thin-film silicon PV cells provides up to 800 Watts of power on a sunny day. Regenerative braking replenishes the batteries, recovering up to 80% of the braking energy.

The car is capable of traveling 140 km/h (87 mph). Driving at highway speeds, eVe uses the equivalent power of a four-slice kitchen toaster. Its range is 800 km (500 mi) using the battery pack supplemented by the solar panels, and 500 km (310 mi) on battery power only.

Read more and see video

Webofgoodnews.com

engineeringhistory:

Nikola Tesla’s patent for “Method of and Apparatus for Controlling Mechanism of Moving Vessels or Vehicles”, 1898, an early use of radio waves.

engineeringhistory:

Nikola Tesla’s patent for “Method of and Apparatus for Controlling Mechanism of Moving Vessels or Vehicles”, 1898, an early use of radio waves.

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Inside an Axial engine

An axial engine has multiple cylinders arranged around and parallel to a central shaft, like the chambers in the cylinder of a revolver. The piston thrust is usually converted to rotary motion by a swashplate or Z-crank mechanism.

the Advantage of the axial engine is that the cylinders are arranged in parallel around the crank shaft rather than at an angle from the crankshaft  like other internal combustion engines. As a result it is compact, cylindrical, and allows variation in compression ratio of the engine while running.