trekeffectapp:

The most beautiful bridges in the world

thekidshouldseethis:

A few marble machines are clickity-clacking in our archives, but never have we seen ones that are designed as laser-cut, flat-packed, wood DIY kits! Hopefully on sale soon from RetroTime.org, a hand cranked Kit2 Marble Machine, above, and a hand cranked Modular Marble Machine - Shield no.2, below: 

There are more kit videos on RetroTime’s YouTube channel.

And in our archives: marble machines and Rube Goldberg machines, including the increasingly-difficult-to-find-on-the-internet Pitagora Suitchi.

via The Awesomer.

Engineers like to solve problems. If there are no problems handily available, they will create their own problems
Scott Adams (via bluedogeyes)
scienceisbeauty:

Solution to the heat equation in a pump casing model using the finite elment modelling software.
(Via Wikimedia Commons)

scienceisbeauty:

Solution to the heat equation in a pump casing model using the finite elment modelling software.

(Via Wikimedia Commons)

engineeringhistory:

Radio equipment, circa 1920s

engineeringhistory:

Radio equipment, circa 1920s

thenewenlightenmentage:

What Does Sound Look Like?
When light passes between areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.
In the mid-19th century, German physicist August Toepler invented a photography technique called Schlieren Flow Visualization to visually capture these changes in density. The setup is a bit hard to explain in words (watch the video above for a full explanation) but it allows scientists and engineers to see things that are normally invisible: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze.
Continue Reading

thenewenlightenmentage:

What Does Sound Look Like?

When light passes between areas of different air density, it bends. You’ve probably noticed the way distant pavement seems to shimmer on a hot day, or the way stars appear to twinkle. You’re seeing light that has been distorted as it passes through varying air densities, which are in turn created by varying temperatures and pressures.

In the mid-19th century, German physicist August Toepler invented a photography technique called Schlieren Flow Visualization to visually capture these changes in density. The setup is a bit hard to explain in words (watch the video above for a full explanation) but it allows scientists and engineers to see things that are normally invisible: the rising heat from a candle, the turbulence around an airplane wing, the plume of a sneeze.

Continue Reading

ucresearch:

Building robots to land on Saturn’s moons


Landing an unmanned robot on another planet can be quite a feat and can end up being quite a complex process.  Scientists want to make this process easier but also allow us to explore worlds that are currently too difficult to land on.

UC Berkeley professor Alice Agogino is working with doctoral students to build what are known as tensegrity robots.  Essentially, these are robots built with a series of rods and tension wires that protect the delicate scientific instruments in the middle.

The structure allows for both flexibility and strength while navigating a rugged environment — for example, landing on a planet’s rocky surface. These robots can explore places that are currently inaccessible to wheeled rovers such as rocky cliffs, which are rich in geological data due to the exposed rock.

Currently, NASA researchers are working on a prototype to one day land on places such as Titan - one of Saturn’s moons.  Scientists are interested in this moon because it has a thick atmosphere with flowing liquids on the surface and is often referred to being the most earthlike world in our solar system.

Read more about this technology

humanoidhistory:

Astronauts Winston E. Scott and Takao Doi wait for a chance to retrieve the Spartan satellite and put it in the Space Shuttle Columbia's cargo bay, 25 November 1997. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

Astronauts Winston E. Scott and Takao Doi wait for a chance to retrieve the Spartan satellite and put it in the Space Shuttle Columbia's cargo bay, 25 November 1997. (NASA)

coolsciencegifs:

Green Fire!

Making green fire involves mixing borax with ethanol and setting it alight in a pyrex/borosilicate vessel (normal glass will just crack and shatter from the heat).

The Science:

This is just like a great big flame test. When boron compounds are heated, electrons absorb a certain amount of heat energy that causes them to jump to higher energy levels. After some time, the electrons lose this energy and fall back down to their original levels, emitting this energy in the form of light. Because the energy absorbed by electrons is different per element, each element will give a different colour. Boron gives a bright green colour. Any other colours such as orange and yellow are probably due to impurities in the mixture such as carbon.

source

Read. It makes you more intelligent. It’s that simple. We all see the universe through the tiny keyhole of our own eyes, and every book is another keyhole from which you can gaze.
Ethan Hawke (via dontgetleftbehind)